Societal image of beauty has diminished young women’s self-worth

Bangkok Bright Smile

By AMANDA NEWMAN on February 21, 2012

 

In 2010, there were over 8,000 breast augmentation surgeries, 3,000 instances of liposuction and 35,000 nose reshaping surgeries — all on females under the age of 19 — according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Those numbers barely hold a candle to the 90,000 boob jobs, 31,000 liposuction surgeries and 75,000 nose jobs done in the same year for women aged 19-29.

It doesn’t surprise me that high school-aged girls want to change their bodies. I’m not at all shocked they would want bigger boobs or slimmer noses. What blows my mind is that they have parents who would support and pay for procedures for bodies that haven’t even fully developed.

I am equally concerned for the women in their 20s jumping on the plastic surgery train.

Women, these are supposed to be our glory years. And I can’t help but worry about what measures will be taken 20 years down the road when un-operated boobs and butts have really started to sag. Some may be forced to file bankruptcy just to support their nipping and tucking.

 

Amanda Newman

It is at an early age that girls start to pinch fat around their waist and stare enviously at other’s seemingly perfect frames. In our society, beauty is power — naturally, everyone wants her fair share.

That is why women walk away from a night out with blisters on their feet and makeup caked into their pores. That is why women spend $60 for someone to cut their hair every six weeks.

But that should not be the reason women who have not even reached their 30s are spending thousands of dollars on plastic surgery.

This search for ultimate beauty is an easy way for a woman to cut herself down. Insecurity is often a large factor in the decision to have cosmetic surgery done. The problem is that women are paying to have their bodies worked on when it is really their confidence that needs the fixing.

Trimmer inner thighs may boost a woman’s ego, but it is only a short period of time before her upper arms jiggle too much or her face is covered in too many wrinkles. That is, at least until she marches back to that plastic surgeon.

In fact, 13 percent of those who had cosmetic surgery last year were returning patients, according to a report by the ASPS. It seems plastic surgery is not always just a one-time fix to a suffering ego.

The truth is: American society is ruthless on the subject of beauty. It is hard to have a high self-esteem no matter what age or even what gender a person may be.

Young women need to realize that working to build their sense of self worth is a much more valuable tool to fight the negativity they feel about their physical appearance.

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